Lynn Haven Panama City Beach

Our Blog

How to Care for a CEREC® Restoration

February 26th, 2020

Our Lynn Haven or Panama City Beach office often provides CEREC for patients who need tooth restorations. Quite simply, patients love their new smiles. And they love the durable, easy-to-care-for natural of CEREC.

For many people, a CEREC restoration is like getting a childhood smile back again -- only more brilliant than ever before.

After treatment, Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller and our team hear a lot of questions about how to keep the repaired smile looking fresh and clean. Keep these tips in mind:

Talk to us: Please don’t leave our office with any unanswered questions about your new restoration. Let us know if you have any concerns about diet, tooth and gum care, or if you feel any discomfort.

Check your smile: People who aren't thrilled with their smiles often avoid looking at their teeth and gums. You may be in the habit of brushing and flossing without even checking the mirror.

With a new smile, the mirror becomes your friend again. Use the mirror when you clean your teeth to make sure you've removed all visible food particles. Check your gumline for redness or tender areas.

Chew things over: Your CEREC restoration should provide a very normal and comfortable eating experience. In fact, if your teeth were giving you problems while eating, the treatment should help relieve the discomfort. If you still experience pain or chewing feels uncomfortable, call our office and let us know.

Brush and floss: CEREC dental restorations need the same care as your natural teeth. Keep brushing and flossing after meals. Use a mouthwash if you prefer or if we recommend one for gum care. Follow any special advice the doctor or the hygienist gives you during your exam.

Finally, make sure to come see us every six months for a cleaning and exam. Caring for your CEREC restorations is that simple, and has the added benefit of helping keep teeth and gums in good shape, too.

CEREC® Single-Visit Crowns

February 19th, 2020

CEREC is an acronym for Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics. It is a type of dental technology that incorporates two computer technologies: CAD (computer-aided design), and CAM (computer-aided manufacturing). CEREC technology allows Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller to design, make, and perfect a crown while you wait in the office. The process is generally completed in less than an hour.

The process begins when we take a picture of the tooth that will receive the crown. Using that picture, a digital impression of the real tooth is created. The proprietary software allows us to create the adjacent teeth digitally, which aids in the process of recreating the computer image that is sent to the milling machine via wireless transmission.

If we recommend a CEREC crown, you will get a permanent crown during a single office visit. We will be able to take a picture of your tooth and mouth, and then create the crown for your tooth. The design process allows us to match your crown to your real tooth as closely as possible.

CEREC crowns are made out of either ceramic material or a type of synthetic resin. Blocks of the material Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller will choose go into the milling machine, where diamond blades file and shape the block of solid material into a crown that will look as much like your real tooth as possible.

Before permanently securing the crown in your mouth with resin cement, we will smooth, file, and refine the shape of the crown, putting it in your mouth to check your bite, and removing it to make small adjustments. After cementing the tooth in your mouth, Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller will check to make sure the surface of the crown is smooth enough to make proper contact with your teeth when you bite down.

For more information about CEREC, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller, please give us a call at our convenient Lynn Haven or Panama City Beach office!

The Origins of Valentine's Day

February 12th, 2020

When we think of Valentine’s Day, we think of cards, flowers, and chocolates. We think of girlfriends celebrating being single together and couples celebrating their relationship. We think of all things pink and red taking over every pharmacy and grocery store imaginable. But what Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller and our team would like to think of is when and how this joyous, love-filled day began.

Several martyrs’ stories are associated with the origins of Valentine’s Day. One of the most widely known suggests that Valentine was a Roman priest who went against the law at a time when marriage had been banned for young men. He continued to perform marriage ceremonies for young lovers in secret and when he was discovered, he was sentenced to death.

Another tale claims that Valentine was killed for helping Christians escape from Roman prisons. Yet another says that Valentine himself sent the first valentine when he fell in love with a girl and sent her a letter and signed it, “From your Valentine.”

Other claims suggest that it all began when Geoffrey Chaucer, an Englishman often referred to as the father of English literature, wrote a poem that was the first to connect St. Valentine to romance. From there, it evolved into a day when lovers would express their feelings for each other. Cue the flowers, sweets, and cards!

Regardless of where the holiday came from, these stories all have one thing in common: They celebrate the love we are capable of as human beings. And though that’s largely in a romantic spirit these days, it doesn’t have to be. You could celebrate love for a sister, a friend, a parent, even a pet.

We hope all our patients know how much we love them! Wishing you all a very happy Valentine’s Day from the team at Bay Smile Docs!

Antibiotic Prophylaxis or Premedication

February 5th, 2020

In years past, it was often recommended that dental patients who had a history of heart problems or other conditions, such as joint implants, be given antibiotics before any dental work. This pre-treatment is called prophylaxis, based on the Greek words for “protecting beforehand.” Why would Dr. Clay Gangwisch, Dr. Mike Grandy, Dr. Daniel Melzer, Dr. Andy Holtery, and Dr. John Miller suggest this protection? It has to do with possible effects of oral bacteria on the rest of the body.

Our bodies are home to bacteria which are common in our mouths, but which can be dangerous elsewhere. If these oral bacteria get into the bloodstream, they can collect around the heart valve, the heart lining, or blood vessels. A rare, but often extremely serious, infection called infective endocarditis can result.

It is no longer recommended that every patient with a heart condition take antibiotics before dental procedures. Doctors worry about adverse effects from antibiotics or, more generally, that an overuse of antibiotics in the general population will lead to more strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

There are some patients, however, who are at a higher risk of developing infective endocarditis, and who should always use preventative antibiotics. Generally, premedication is advised if you have one of these risk factors:

  • A history of infective endocarditis
  • Certain congenital heart conditions (heart conditions present since birth)
  • An artificial heart valve
  • A heart transplant

Your cardiologist will know if prophylaxis is advisable, and if you are taking any drugs which could interact with antibiotics. Always talk to your doctor about any dental procedures you are planning, particularly if they are invasive procedures such as gum surgery or extractions.

If you believe you would benefit from antibiotics before dental treatment at our Lynn Haven or Panama City Beach office, the most important first step is to talk with your doctors. We are trained to know which pre-existing health conditions call for prophylaxis, which dental procedures require them, which antibiotics to use, and when to take them. Tell us about any health conditions you have, especially cardiac or vascular issues, and any medication allergies. Working with you and your doctor to protect your health is our first priority, and having a complete picture of your medical health will let us know if antibiotic prophylaxis is right for you.

sesame communicationsWebsite Powered by Sesame 24-7™ Site Map Back to Top
Schedule Your Exam Today!
Lynn Haven (850) 271-2341
Panama City Beach (850) 271-0045